Interior and Exterior Accessible Routes


Thursday, January 7, 2021
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM Eastern Time Zone

Description

Under the ADA and ABA Accessibility Standards, an accessible route must connect to all accessible elements and spaces on a site. This session will provide an in-depth review of when accessible routes are required and issues such as overlapping clear space requirements and door maneuvering clearances. The session will also address exterior routes such as site arrival points, connections to transit stops and public streets and sidewalks and unique accessible route exceptions permitted at recreation facilities. Presenters will highlight some of the more frequently asked questions and common source of confusion for accessible routes.

Continuing Education Recognition Available

Certificate Credit hours
ACTCP 1.5
AIA HSW CES 1.5
California Architects Board 1.5
Certificate of Attendance 1.5
ICC 1.5

Speakers:

Bill Botten, Training and Technical Assistance Coordinator, Senior Accessibility Specialist, Office of Technical and Information Services, U.S. Access Board

Scott Windley, Accessibility Specialist, Office of Technical and Information Services, U.S. Access Board

Questions for presenters:

1 Setting - Federal lands in remote areas (gravel parking lots). What types of non-concrete, non-asphalt, non-boardwalk materials are acceptable materials for establishing an accessible route (thinking compacted decomposed granite, compacted road base - what else?).
2 When are accessible routes required in an employee only area with no access to the public that contains a couple of buildings on the site? The public does not have access to any of the buildings and the public does not have access to the site/property that the buildings are located on.
3 When are accessible routes required in an employee only area with no access to the public that contains a couple of buildings on the site? The public does not have access to any of the buildings and the public does not have access to the site/property that the buildings are located on.
4 With quiet electric cars now coming on strong, with several manufacturers stating they'll be eliminating petroleum based power plants within 10 or so years, is this the correct time to consider another look at detectable warnings placed on the sides of / ramps at driveway cuts at unsignalized drives?
5 5. With pedestrians (including wheelchairs, bicyclists, and slow moving pedestrians) that encounter highway-rail at-grade crossings, will the presentation include current ADA 2010 Standards (like Section 810.10) vs. US Access Board Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities (Section 1103.7) in relation to openings, flangeway gaps, and slopes along the pedestrian path? Does the ADA standard take precedence over the guidelines, should a conflict exist?
6 Can you please address the issue of points of arrival and an accessible route to a building entrance in reference to Exception 2 under ADAS 206 and Advisory 206.2.1 Site Arrival Points Exception 2? US DOJ stated that the exception applied in limited circumstances like a long remote road leading to an isolated business building, or a self-storage facility that people drive to, but this exception is universally applied to every existing facility (shopping centers, etc.)
7 Any / all research, best practices, standards on pedestrian detours; especially temporary / relocated street crossings. The MUTCD is extremely weak in this area. My interest: Temporary Traffic Control in the Greater Phoenix, (Maricopa Co) AZ area with summer pavement temperatures 135 F + with long distances between marked crosswalks.
8 Setting - In a 50 ft. length of concrete walkway, measurements were taken every 10 ft. for cross slope (2.0, 2.1, 2.0, 2.0, 2.2, 2.2 %) for an average of 2.08%. May an allowable construction tolerance (e.g. ACI 117) in accord with 104.1.1 be allowed for the slopes of walking surfaces at 403.3?
9 How are accessible route requirements determined for private multi family residential sites? In particular along private access driveways and interior walkways between units.
10 Cross slope of a pedestrian access route in ADAAG is represented as a ratio (1:48 max) and as a percentage (2% max) in PROWAG. The 1:48 ratio is ADAAG is very specific but the 2% is PROWAG seems to leave a little room for interpretation because it is represented a a whole number. From a PROWAG perspective, is 1.5% to 2.4% considered 2% as a whole number?
11 What are the most unique or accommodations that have been missed and should be on our list of standard considerations?

Session Questions

This session is accepting questions from registered users. After you have registered to participate in this session you can submit your questions on your Account Manager page. Please note: the number of questions will be limited and submissions will be closed well before the session starts to provide time to prepare answers.